Visitor Policy & Service Updates

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, our hospitals, emergency departments and ambulatory sites will remain open to serve the community. However, we need to take important steps to keep patients, visitors and staff safe.

The Montefiore Moses Campus has been selected by Governor Andrew Cuomo as one of 20 hospitals across the state to participate in a two-week hospital visitation pilot program to allow increased, but limited, visitations for family members and loved ones.

More details »

Dr. Theresa Madaline, Infectious Disease Specialist, sitting in office discussing COVID-19 and grocery shopping.

How do you get groceries safely? Montefiore’s Dr. Theresa Madaline, Infectious Disease Specialist and Epidemiologist, discusses how to shop safely for groceries.

Transcript

There's a number of things you can do to help protect yourself while grocery shopping. It's important to stay six feet away from other shoppers. It's helpful to wear a face covering while you're in the store. And if you have hand sanitizer, it's a good idea to clean your hands frequently and to avoid touching your eyes and your mouth while you're shopping.

Shopping carts are high touch surfaces. So you have a couple of options. You can, if you have one available, clean the handle with a disinfecting wipe right before you start shopping. You can also use a tissue or a paper towel or even a plastic bag to cover the handle of the shopping cart while you're in the store. It's important that if you're going to handle cash that you wash your hands after you've touched the money.

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Dr. Simon Rego, Chief Psychologist, sitting in an office discussing the myth that COVID-19 is nothing to worry about.

Is it normal to think about COVID-19 all the time? Montefiore’s Chief Psychologist, Dr. Simon Rego, discusses why it's normal and whether to seek help.

Transcript

The first thing you should know is this is perfectly normal. Given that we're hearing messages of COVID-19 and the dangers and risks and uncertainties around it in the news, everywhere we turn, we're being triggered to think about it. So the key thing to first recognize and accept, is that we're all going to be a little bit more aware of it, and we're all going to be focused on it more in the days to come. The real question that starts to become, is it causing excessive distress or stopping you from living the life you want to live? In those instances, it may be useful to turn to someone to get some assistance.

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COVID-19 Symptoms

People with COVID‑19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported, from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. Individuals experiencing these symptoms or combination of symptoms may have COVID‑19:

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Cover Coughs

Cough

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Shortness of Breath

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing


Or at least two of the symptoms below:

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Fever

Fever

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Chills

Chills

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Repeated shaking with chills

Repeated shaking with chills

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Muscle Pain

Muscle pain

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Headache

Headache

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Sore Throat

Sore throat

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New loss of taste or smell

New loss of taste or smell

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Diarrhea

Diarrhea


This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

This Way to Heroes

Your Gratitude Keeps Us Going

The current outpouring of appreciation for New York's healthcare workers has been truly humbling. Our community's grace and optimism in the face of hardship inspires us every day. To all those who have cheered and honored our heroes, and to the many who are giving to support our COVID-19 efforts, Montefiore-Einstein would like to thank you. To those who would like to show their support, here's how.

How does COVID-19 spread?

The virus is thought to spread by people in close contact (approximately within 6 feet) through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It is also possible to contract the virus by touching an infected surface or item and then touching the nose, eyes or mouth. The virus may be able to live on a surface for a prolonged period of time.

Protect Yourself
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Wash Hands
Wash hands frequently with soap
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Avoid Touching eyes and mouth
Avoid touching eyes, nose, mouth
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Seek Care
Seek care if you develop a fever, cough or shortness of breath
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Avoid Close Contact
Avoid close contact with people who are sick
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Distance
Maintain social distance of at least 6 feet
Protect Others
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Stay Home
Stay home if you’re unwell
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Cover coughs and sneezes
Cover coughs and sneezes
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Clean and disinfect surfaces
Clean and disinfect surfaces
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Mask
Use a face covering when leaving the home for essentials
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Distance
Maintain social distance of at least 6 feet

Trusted Information Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The leading national public health institute of the United States
 

NY.gov

For the latest COVID-19 guidelines and information from New York State 

World Health Organization

UN agency responsible for international public health